Are You Diabetic?…Did You Know?

I have a family history of diabetes, I had gestational diabetes and a little over 10 years ago I was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. So as you can probably imagine I have done some looking into this disorder more than I may have previously. I have taken a Diabetes nutrition class, and I also utilize two different types of Insulin, one long acting and one fast acting. Now for the longest time I believed that once I started taking better care of myself I would be able to stop utilizing Insulin. Evidently according to my last two healthcare providers Dr. Amy Tubay and Megan Greising, PA this is not the likeliest of outcomes. So when I came across this article today in Very Well Health by Debra Manzella, RN and reviewed by Richard N. Fogoros, MD, I took time to read it and found a break down on insulin that I appreciated for its simplicity in explaining insulin and what the different types are and what they do.

Knowing as they say is half the battle of course the other half is implementation. Unfortunately for me I am not great at the implementation part the majority of the time, I am very easily derailed by things I like that are not conducive to good health, but I continue to try and do the best I can for the most part.

When your physician prescribes insulin, needs of the patient are matched to the best insulin characteristics, of which there are three.

  1. Onset- the time it takes for the insulin to start working
  2. Peak Time- the time during which the insulin is most effective
  3. Duration- the length of time that the insulin is considered to be effective.

The six types of Insulin listed in the article are

  1. Rapid-acting
  2. Regular (short-acting)
  3. Intermediate-acting
  4. Long-acting
  5. Combination
  6. Inhaled (this is fairly new to the game only available since 2015)

https://www.verywellhealth.com/insulin-action-reference-chart-1087281?utm_campaign=diabetesirl&utm_medium=email&utm_source=cn_nl&utm_content=14357666&utm_term=fluentl

Above is a link to the article, I hope you’ll find it as beneficial as I did and of course I encourage you to bring up any questions you may have regarding the information enclosed within the article with your primary healthcare provider.

I hope that your day has been and continues to be a great one, and that your tomorrow is even better. ‘Til next time.

Heidi

 

Advertisements

PAIN…What is it?

Generally, pain falls into three categories of causation. These categories are, Nociceptive Pain, Neuropathic Pain and Central Pain.

  1. Nociceptive Pain – This is the most common form of pain experienced. Occurring as a response to an injury. For example when I was in a car accident and slammed into the gear shift from the passenger side (really learned to appreciate seat belts after this one). Everyone of us has experienced this type of pain at some point. This type of pain will usually dissipate with treatment and eventually go away completely.
  2. Neuropathic Pain – This pain is do to damage to the bodies Nervous System and is fairly common as it affects between 7-10% of the worlds population. The types of issues that neuropathic pain results from are pretty well known, diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson’s, HIV and of course Diabetes. One specific treatment method used today can also cause this type of pain and that is Chemotherapy as a result of its destructive effects to many cells in the body. Those who experience this type of pain are definitely on a roller coaster ride with this because it is very difficult to treat and the options for treatment can be very addictive.
  3. Central Pain – Central Pain can on occasion be injury related, however the most common cause of Central Pain is unknown thus making it very hard to treat. One of the most common diagnosis involving this kind of pain is Fibromyalgia. It is believed that Fibromyalgia is caused as a result of the malfunction of the way pain signals travel to the brain and the way they are processed.

Pain occurrences are obviously varied and will effect each of us differently and treatment options are just as different for each of us. Decades have gone by with severe research restrictions being enforced at least here in the states on what can be explored and what can’t, but there is light at the end of the tunnel due to the growth in the acceptance of Medical Cannabis use. We are entering an era now where these much needed studies are being conducted. Cannabinoid treatment studies are growing in number and are demonstrating that cannabis is an effective treatment option with far less costly side effects than what we have been encouraged to accept using current pain treatments such as Opioids.

Latter I’ll be talking about the information regarding the best product types and benefits as well as how cannabinoids work within the body.

Til next time I’m sending each of you all hope for a great day today and a better tomorrow.

p.s. any comments, questions, or suggestions are always appreciated.

Vitamin D deficiency, What are the risks?

We all know from a young age that vitamin D builds strong bones, and it is foundly named the Sunshine vitamin. Yet, what else does it do and what happens when you don’t get enough?

Activated Vitamin D hormone helps control the immune system and has anti-inflammatory attributes. Thus in the event you don’t have enough you could be opening yourself up to some troublesome health issues such as

  • Increased risk of death from Cardiovascular disease
  • Severe Asthma in children
  • COPD
  • Cancer
  • Cognitive impairment in older Adults
  • Rickets- a condition that affects bone developement in children

Most recently a report published in the June 19, 2018 edition of the Journal of Nutrition by researchers from Johns Hopkins University, which utilized data accumulated over 10 years for more than 6,000 Adults found that low levels of Vitamin D are linked with an increased risk of a disease which causes scarring and inflamation of the lungs identified as Interstitial Lung disease (ILD). Over the 10 year time frame it was discovered that lower than normal blood levels of Vitamin D demonstrated an increased risk factor in ILD developement.

Bering in mind that the researchers do caution that cause and effect are not proven, the findings of the report do support the need for further investigation, however this study suggests that Vitamin D levels may be important to lung health. It may behoove us to now think about adding Vitamin D deficiency to the list of factors along with the other known ILD risks, ie. enviornmental toxins (asbestos, coal dust), Autoimmune disorders like Rheumatoid Arthritis, infections or medication side effects.

Other research suggests that Vitamin D contributes to treatment and prevention of many types of chronic long term health issues for example Diabetes both Types 1 and 2, glucose intolerence, hypertension and multiple sclerosis.

Causes of Vitamin D deficiency can arise from a number of things.

  • Lack of Sunlight- The sunshine vitamin is made naturally in our bodies when our skin is exposed to sunlight without sunscreen, however for a variety of reasons this natural remedy may be prohibitive for some.
  • Darker skin – The pigment melanin reduces the skin’s ability to make vitamn D in response to sunlight exposure.
  • Obesity- Vitamin D is extracted from the blood by fat cells, altering its release into circulation. A body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more often is indicative of low levels in the blood.

Additional reasons could be the inability of your digestive tract to absorb vitamin D as seen in conditions like Crhons or celiac disease. Kidney inability to convert vitamin D to its active form just to name a couple.

I personaly suffer from vitamin D deficiency and up until recently I had been taking 50,000 IU (international units) weekly. Depending on age and health issues, the Institute of Medicine has increased the Recommended Dietary Allowence (RDA) of Vitamin D to 600 IU daily for everyone age 1 to 70, and for those who are 70 and older the daily amount should be 800 IU. Now in the event a person is in fact Vitamin D deficient in order to correct the upper limit was raised to 4,000 IU daily with a Doctor being able to prescribe more than that if needed. My daily dosage broke down to 7,143 IU.

As always be upfront with your doctor and discuss options if you feel you may be at risk.

Until next time Peace, Harmony and Joy to one and all.

“What the Health?”

This is the title to a film that logically explains what is one of the largest consumer covers ups ever, and is largely unknown by the majority of people.

It is driven and supported by the corporate owners of such entities as Subway, Hormel, Oscar Myer, The Meat and Dairy Association and of course the U.S.D.A. just to name a few. The organizations that are direct beneficiaries of this cover up are just as varied they are for example Susan G. Komen, American Heart Association, American Cancer Society, American Diabetes Association all of whom most of us are aware of or familiar with in some way. All of whom we believe to be working to improve our lives and to aid those who may be affected by Heart Disease, Diabetes, Cancer. These are the organizations that we as consumers are encouraged to utilize in order to understand, and base wise health decisions utilizing the information we are lead to believe is to our benefit.

I am asking everyone to take 92 minutes out of your busy day to watch this film. Then it is up to you as to what to do afterwards.

Let me know what you think I would love to discuss.

 

The Best Bread for People With Diabetes

This article is a great read for the simple fact that although the title infers its relativity to those of us with Diabetes, really the information is beneficial to all.
I have recently discovered a Kroger store brand at my local grocery that is really tasty and is sugar free, with only 80 calories per slice and Whole Wheat.
I love Sourdough so Yaaaaay.
Updated November 22, 2017

Learn What You Should Be Looking For and What to Avoid.

Whether you’re new to diabetes or have had it for a long time, you may have heard that bread is “off limits.” For some people, this makes managing diets easier—ditching bread eliminates the need to worry about or decide what kind to eat.

Understandably, though, you don’t want to feel restricted and would rather learn what types of breads are best and what you should look for when shopping for a store-bought brand.

The good news is that if you have diabetes, you can eat bread—and there are plenty of healthy choices! Whole grain breads, such as whole wheat, rye, sprouted breads, and organic whole grain varieties are rich in vitamins, minerals, fiber, protein. These types of breads are superior to refined, processed breads, like white bread.

The tricky part is sifting through the grocery store inventory and locating a tasty and nutritious brand. With many options to choose from, you can certainly get lost in the bread aisle. Having an understanding of what you should look for and what you should avoid can help you make better choices.

Analyze the Nutrients

It’s important to take a stance on what your focus is. For example, are you looking for a bread that is strictly low calorie and low in carbohydrates? If that’s the case, you may find some really good options, however, these choices may contain artificial ingredients, flavorings, and other additives.

Or are you looking for a bread that is organic, free of GMOs and has a good amount of fiber and protein? These options are available too, however, you may have to spend more money on breads like this.

Whatever type of bread you are looking for, sticking to some guidelines can help you make an informed decision.

I’ve also included some good choices, many of which have been recommended by people with diabetes as well as other certified diabetes educators. There is something for everyone. And if you aren’t sure if your bread is the best for you, ask your dietitian or certified diabetes educator.

For people with diabetes, there are things to consider when purchasing a bread. When reading labels, you’ll want to look at the calories, carbohydrate, fiber, fat, and sodium. You’ll also want to read the ingredient list and make sure your bread is whole grain.

Calories

It’s best to keep your bread around 90 calories or less per slice, especially if you plan on eating two slices. Breads that contain nuts and seeds can be a good choice as they contain some healthy fats, protein, and fiber, but they will be higher in calories. If you’d like to choose a bread like this and the calorie count is high, you’ll want to keep your portion to one slice.

Carbohydrate

When you have diabetes, watching your carbohydrate intake is very important. Carbohydrates are the types of nutrient that impact blood sugar the most. Depending on your meal plan and how many carbohydrates you aim to eat per meal, most people benefit from choosing a bread that contains 15 to 20 grams or less of carbohydrate per serving.

Always make sure to read labels and adhere to the serving size. If you decide to purchase bakery bread that does not contain a label, you can weigh your bread to calculate your carbohydrate intake. For example, 1 ounce of bread contains about 15 grams of carbohydrate, therefore if your bakery bread weighs in at 2 ounces it contains about 30 grams of carbohydrate.

Fiber

Fiber is an important nutrient in the diet, especially for people who have diabetes. Fiber helps to slow down how quickly blood sugars rise, increases feelings of fullness, pulls cholesterol away from the heart, and helps to keep bowels regular.

Aim to find a bread that is a good source of fiber and contains at least 3 grams in a two slice serving.

Fat

There are different types of fat—saturated, unsaturated, and trans fat. People with diabetes want to eat a diet that is low in saturated and trans fat and contains adequate amounts of unsaturated, heart healthy fat.

Most breads aren’t very high in fat (unless they have seeds or nuts). However, you’ll want to choose a bread that has 0 grams trans fat and less than about 1.5 grams saturated fat.

Sodium

Diets rich in sodium can contribute to elevated blood pressure, especially in people who are sensitive to salt. Aim to keep you bread to about 150 mg or less per slice.

Analyze the Ingredients

Look for a bread that is 100 percent whole grain. This means that the bread has not been refined and the grain is still intact. Whole grains have more vitamins, minerals, and fiber.

In order for something to be a whole grain, the first ingredient should say “whole.” You can also confirm a bread is a whole grain if it has the whole grain stamp.

Ingredients to Avoid

In a perfect world, we would all make our own bread using the highest quality ingredients. But, realistically this isn’t possible for everyone. Commercial breads use many additives to help flavor bread, maintain shelf-life, and shorten dough rising time. Additives are deemed safe by the FDA in the amounts they are presented in the bread, but that doesn’t make them ideal.

Some ingredients you’ll want to shy away from include high fructose corn syrup (which is associated with obesity and other health issues), partially hydrogenated oils (aka trans fat), and dough conditioners such as azodicarbonamide, DATEM, and artificial colors.

Available Bread Varieties

Note this article does not address wraps or breakfast muffins.

Whole Grain Bread

A bread that is 100 percent whole grain is a bread that is made with the entire grain intact, which increases its nutrition profile and typically lowers its glycemic index (how quickly blood sugar rises after consuming it).

Whole grain bread is not limited to whole wheat. Other whole grain breads may include rye, barley, oat, quinoa, amaranth, and millet. To make sure your bread is whole grain, look at the ingredient list. The first ingredient should read whole.

It’s important to read labels carefully. Don’t get tricked by labels that read multi-grain or seven-grain—this doesn’t automatically make it a whole grain bread. When in doubt, check the ingredient list or look for the whole grain stamp.

Sprouted Breads

Sprouted breads contain no flour—they are made from sprouting grains, beans, and seeds in water and combining them with freshly sprouted live grains. Next, they are mixed into dough and slowly baked into bread.

This process helps to lower the glycemic index of the bread and increases the nutrition profile. Most sprouted grains contain all nine essential amino acids and are rich in protein and fiber. They can provide a tougher texture and should be stored in the freezer for optimal freshness. Ideally, you’ll want to toast them and eat them right away. Therefore, they may not make the best sandwich to take on-the-go.

Sourdough Breads

Some people just cannot get used to the texture of whole grain bread or other sprouted grains. If that is the case for you then perhaps trying sourdough bread is an option.

Traditional sourdough bread is made by slowly fermenting water and flour so that it yields wild yeasts (or good bacteria) that is used to help the dough rise. There is an increasing amount of research being done on the benefits of fermented foods. Consumption of fermented foods increases good bacteria in the gut and may benefit your immune system while reducing the risk of inflammation and allergies.

Keep in mind though that most commercial sourdough bread is processed. To get the most benefit from sourdough bread, purchase from a bakery or make your own.

Organic Breads

Organic breads are made with organic ingredients and produced without using conventional pesticides, fertilizers made with synthetic ingredients or sewage sludge, bioengineering, or ionizing radiation, which means they do not contain any pesticides, herbicides, or genetically modified ingredients. These may be a bit more expensive and not offer much benefit carbohydrate-wise.

Gluten-Free Varieties

Just because something is gluten-free doesn’t necessarily make it healthier. But, some people with diabetes also have celiac disease and must avoid gluten. If you have Celiac disease or avoid gluten because you are sensitive to it, finding a healthy gluten-free bread can be a struggle. Gluten helps to give bread it’s elasticity, therefore manufacturers often use alternative ingredients, such as refined starches, to help replicate the texture.

When looking for a gluten-free bread, stick to the calorie, carbohydrate, fiber, and fat guidelines mentioned above as best as you can. You’ll also want to try to choose one that contains whole grains, such as, brown rice, millet, and quinoa.

Recommended Brands

Below you’ll find some top bread picks from people with diabetes, dietitians, and other certified diabetes educators. They’ve been chosen based on likability and nutrition profile. You’ll find whole wheat varieties as well as rye, sprouted breads, and organic varieties.

Remember, when in doubt discuss your bread choice with your dietitian and if you are wondering how your blood sugar responds to a certain bread, you can test your blood sugar two hours after ingesting—if you are at goal, it’s a good choice for you.

100% Whole Wheat

Whole Grain Bread

Sprouted Breads

Gluten-Free Breads

A Word From Verywell

If you have diabetes, bread can still be part of your meal plan if you choose wisely. When searching the grocery aisles, make sure to read the labels and check for things like calories, carbohydrates, and ingredients. Aim to choose whole grain varieties that are low in added sugars and rich in fiber. Whether you are choosing whole wheat, another whole grain variety, organic, or gluten free, there is something out there for everyone.

Sources:

American Diabetes Association. Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes – 2017. Diabetes Care. 2017 Jan; 38 (Suppl 1): S1-132. 

Ye EQ, et. al. Greater whole-grain intake is associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and weight gain. J Nutr. 2012 Jul;142(7):1304-13